HPHR Themes – Spring 2018

The Harvard Public Health Review (HPHR) is accepting submissions for the following themes:   

– Sexual Harassment and Public Health: Deadline April 10
– Violence and Public Health: Deadline April 10
– Climate Change and Public Health: Deadline May 14

– Non-Communicable Diseases: Deadline May 14

Full descriptions of the themes are available below.

 

Who May Submit and Where?
Students and faculty across academic disciplines at Harvard and other institutions, as well as members of the general public, are invited to submit articles related to these themes, by their respective deadlines, at tinyurl.com/HPHRSubmissions or submissions@harvardpublichealthreview.org.

View past HPHR editions and submissions guidelines at www.harvardpublichealthreview.org. Though the board encourages evidence-based commentaries/op-eds on these described here, submissions are addressing any public health issue are welcome. Please contact the Board prior to submitting original research, infographics, and/or photo essays at editorial@harvardpublichealthreview.org.

 

What Should Be Submitted?
Evidence-based commentaries/op-eds are preferred, though other submissions, such as original research, infographics, and photo essays are welcome with prior permission. Please send inquiries to editorial@harvardpublichealthreview.org for additional information.

 

Must Submissions Focus on One of the Themes?
Submissions DO NOT have to conform to the four themes.

 

How Should Pieces Be Formatted?
Please visit www.harvardpublichealthreview.org to review past editions of the journal and download the submission guidelines.

 

Where Should Submissions and Questions Be Submitted?
Submit articles (both related and unrelated to these themes) to tinyurl.com/HPHRSubmissions or send an email to submissions@harvardpublichealthreview.org.

 

Descriptions for each of the themes are as follows:

Sexual Harassment and Violence: Deadline April 10
Over the past few years, a number high-profile allegations of sexual harassment and violence in the entertainment, academic, and political arenas have resulted in much-needed national awareness and discussion. In addition to extensive media exposes, numerous individual stories have emerged via social media, driven by the viral #MeToo and #TimesUp hashtag movements. Yet these reports often elide the voices underserved population, including women, LGBTIQ persons, sex workers, children, and others, who bear the burden of sexual harassment and violence in this country and globally. This volume of HPHR seeks to deepen the national conversation around sexual harassment and violence in the U.S. and abroad. We are particularly interested in evidence-based editorials that address the social inequities and injustices that underpin the determinants of sexual harassment and violence, and result in less optimal health outcomes for those impacted.

 

Violence and Public Health: Deadline April 10
National headlines about violence, from the bombings in Syria to the police killings and school shootings in the U.S., continue to highlight the fraught relationship between violence and negative physical and mental health outcomes. Defined by the World Health Organization as the “intentional use of physical force or power, threatened or actual, against oneself, another person, or against a group or community, that either results in or has a high likelihood of resulting in injury, death, psychological harm, maldevelopment or deprivation” violence is the leading cause of death worldwide for persons aged 15-44. In the U.S., homicide and suicide have consistently ranked in the top 15 causes of death since the late 1960s, with most of the country’s cities reporting intentional violence as the main cause of death for all persons under age 34. Survivors and witnesses of violence are more likely to be aggressors later, and have a greater likelihood of developing chronic diseases (heart disease, asthma, stroke, cancer, and more), mental health issues (such as PTSD, stress, anxiety, and depression), reduced quality of life, and a great likelihood of being an aggressor of violence.

HPHR seeks papers that address the ongoing debate about the disparate motivations and determinants that drive and mitigate violence in its many forms (ranging from gun violence and terrorism to police shootings and gender-based violence) in the U.S. and globally. We are particularly interested in pieces that concern the disparate social, political, economic, and psychological  stressors that have driven the disparate impact of violence among historically vulnerable populations, including women, children sexual and gender minorities, and racial and ethnic minorities, across the individual (home, family); community (school and workplace); and national (state-based warfare) levels.  

 

Climate Change and Public Health
HPHR seeks papers around climate change and its impact on the interdependent relationships between human populations and natural systems. In recent decades, population expansion and technological advancements have resulted in environmental damages to our air, water and land. These, in turn, have resulted in climate-change driven weather and geological events that have undermined biodiversity, food production, and clean water access, resulting in a surge of preventable deaths and exposures to communicable and noncommunicable diseases. We are seeking evidence-based editorials that discuss the disparate impact of climate change around the world, examine current and emerging hotspots, and highlight proposed and ongoing policy solutions and interventions.  

 

Non-Communicable Diseases
Public health-driven policies and interventions have led to precipitous drops in deaths from communicable diseases, such as tuberculosis and malaria. Addressing preventable early death from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including cancers, heart and lung diseases, and diabetes, remains a significant hurdle for countries worldwide. HPHR seeks papers to address these social determinants driving the distribution and impact of NCDs among underserved populations and globally. Of particular interest are evidence-based editorials describing current and/or proposed policy solutions and interventions to address mitigate the impact of NCDs.  

Addressing preventable early death from noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including cancers, heart and lung diseases, and diabetes, remains a significant hurdle for countries worldwide. HPHR seeks papers to address these social determinants driving the distribution and impact of NCDs among underserved populations and globally. Of particular interest are evidence-based editorials describing current and/or proposed policy solutions and interventions to address mitigate the impact of NCDs.  

 

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